Turbo Failures by Turbo OE Number

At Melett, we continually obtain a wealth of useful information about specific turbo numbers and their reasons for failure. Through invaluable customer feedback and failure diagnosis by our in-house technical department, we have collated a list of our findings against the specific turbo number.

Please Note: the list is in turbo number order for ease of reference.

Disclaimer: This information is continually collated from a number of sources including; customer feedback, market intelligence and Melett’s own failure analysis programme, and is provided to assist our valued customers in identifying known failures of specific turbo numbers.

 

454135-0009 / 0010

Obstructed valves in the cylinder head can lead to a loss of oil to the turbocharger, caused by an increase of pressure within the crankcase.

This pressure prevents the oil from flowing back to the crankcase via the turbo drain tube, and increases the pressure and temperature of the oil resulting in an oil leak at the compressor end of the turbocharger, causing blue smoke. If this is identified early enough, changing the filter will be sufficient to solve the problem.

However, if the oil loss has been happening over some time, the oil will carbonise behind the turbine wheel causing turbo failure, and in this case it is necessary to change the filter and the complete turbocharger.

Click on the turbo number for Melett parts availability: 454135-0009 / 454135-0010

Related page: Oil Leaks
49131-05313

A lack of oil supply to the turbo (lack of lubrication) has been reported as the common mode of failure, resulting in catastrophic damage to the bearing systems, which can occur within seconds.

We have been advised that drivers have experienced issues such as a lack of power, and also reports of vehicles smoking from the exhaust leading up to the failure on this turbo.

Upon investigation, signs of oil starvation can include discolouration to the thrust parts and the journal bearing diameter of the shaft & wheel.

Related page:Lack of Lubrication
49131-06007

A common mode of failure is from foreign object damage to the impellor blades on either side of the turbo. Both the air intake side of the turbo (compressor side) and the engine side of the turbo (exhaust side) sustain blade damage from foreign objects.  Initial signs of a problem include loud noises such as whistling, or a lack of performance.

In the case of foreign object damage to the impellor blades on either side of the turbo, it is advisable to check the air filter for foreign objects, and also check the intake hose for debris and/or damage.

We have also received reports that there has been issues with the EGR valve sticking on this application due to high carbon/exhaust soot build up. Failure to replace or clean the valve may result in immediate failure of the turbocharger.

 Related page: Foreign Object Damage
49135-05671 / 05670 / 05660 / 05651 / 05650 / 05640 / 05620 / 05610

We have received many reports that faulty electronic actuator boxes are common on these turbochargers. Fault codes are normally identified when a diagnostic test is performed on the vehicle and this type of failure is often a result of a blocked engine breather assembly.

The engine breather assembly found on top of the CAM cover can get clogged causing the engine to perform less efficiently. This congestion then causes increased crankcase pressure, which creates an increased back pressure in the sump forcing the oil back up the oil return pipe to the turbo. Over a period of time this escaping oil can cause a carbon build up around the variable vane assembly restricting their movement (i.e. sticky vanes). This restriction affects the operation of the electronic actuator generating the fault codes picked up on the diagnostic test mentioned above.

The result can be a destroyed turbo or in other cases the driver may have experienced issues with the vehicle, such as a lack of power and/or smoking from the exhaust leading up to the failure.

Click on the turbo number for Melett parts availability: 49135-05671 / 49135-05670 / 49135-05660 / 49135-05651 / 49135-05650 / 49135-05640 / 49135-05620 / 49135-05610

Related pages: Oil Contamination / Oil Starvation / Oil Leaks
49135-05670

An obstruction to the breather filter in the cylinder head can lead to a loss of oil through the turbocharger due to increased pressure in the crankcase.

This pressure prevents the oil returning to the crankcase through the oil return pipe and increases the turbo pressure and temperature, resulting in oil leaks at both the compressor and turbine ends.

If the oil leak is caught in time, a filter change will be sufficient to solve the problem.

However, if the oil leak is not identified it will carbonise behind the turbine wheel, resulting in turbo failure.

Related pages: Oil Leaks
49135-05895 / 05885 / 05880 / 05870 / 05850 / 05840 / 05830

We have received many reports that faulty electronic actuator boxes are common on these turbochargers. Fault codes are normally identified when a diagnostic test is performed on the vehicle and this type of failure is often a result of a blocked engine breather assembly.

The engine breather assembly found on top of the CAM cover can get clogged causing the engine to perform less efficiently. This congestion then causes increased crankcase pressure, which creates an increased back pressure in the sump forcing the oil back up the oil return pipe to the turbo. Over a period of time this escaping oil can cause a carbon build up around the variable vane assembly restricting their movement (i.e. sticky vanes). This restriction affects the operation of the electronic actuator generating the fault codes picked up on the diagnostic test mentioned above.

The result can be a destroyed turbo or in other cases the driver may have experienced issues with the vehicle, such as a lack of power and/or smoking from the exhaust leading up to the failure.

Click on the turbo number for Melett parts availability: 49135-05895 / 49135-05885 / 49135-05880 / 49135-05870 / 49135-05850 / 49135-05840 / 49135-05830

Related pages: Oil Contamination / Oil Starvation / Oil Leaks
49173-07506/8

The PSA 1.6HDi engine is designed to work at high temperatures and using good quality oil is essential. PSA has installed a filter on the oil feed pipe to the turbo and an integral filter/oil cooler to ensure that it performs efficiently. If a lower grade oil is used, reports indicate that if the engine runs on oil levels below normal, this can potentially cause a high concentration of soot in the oil. This soot can block the filter installed in the turbo supply pipe, the oil cooler and main filter, causing the turbo to fail. The vacuum pump may also suffer due to this type of pollution.

As the turbo rotates at 230,000 rpm, it will generally be the first part of the engine showing any signs of failure. This can happen from 45,000km onwards if the oil level is low, or when the oil changes are not made in the periods set or potentially when the oil recommended by the manufacturer is not used.

Click on the turbo number for Melett parts availability: 49173-07506 / 49173-07508

 Related page: Oil Contamination / Oil Starvation / Lack of Lubrication
49335-00510 / 00511 / 00500 / 00512 / 00560 / 00561 / 00580 / 00581 / 00582 / 00583 / 00584

We have received reports that faulty electronic actuator boxes are common on these turbochargers. Fault codes are normally identified when a diagnostic test is performed on the vehicle and this type of failure is often a result of a blocked engine breather assembly.

This N47 engine has an integrated breather assembly found in the CAM cover and can easily become congested/blocked causing the engine to perform less efficiently. In addition, it is also recommended that a ‘Regeneration’ of the Diesel Particle Filter (DPF) is carried out to avoid the DPF becoming restricted because of the driving profile. If the exhaust backpressure continues to rise and is not resolved this will in turn cause the exhaust gases to force the turbos shaft assembly back damaging the thrust bearing in the turbo, which usually results in the turbo being destroyed. These issues then affect the operation of the electronic actuator generating the fault codes picked up on the diagnostic tests mentioned above.

The result can be a destroyed turbo or in other cases the driver may have experienced issues with the vehicle, such as a lack of power and/or smoking from the exhaust leading up to the failure.

Click on the turbo number for Melett parts availability: 49335-00510 / 49335-00511 / 49335-00500 / 49335-00512 / 49335-00560 / 49335-00561 / 49335-00580 / 49335-00581 / 49335-00582 / 49335-00583 / 49335-00584

49373-02000

The PSA 1.6HDi engine is designed to work at high temperatures and using good quality oil is essential. PSA has installed a filter on the oil feed pipe to the turbo and an integral filter/oil cooler to ensure that it performs efficiently. If a lower grade oil is used, reports indicate that if the engine runs on oil levels below normal, this can potentially cause a high concentration of soot in the oil. This soot can block the filter installed in the turbo supply pipe, the oil cooler and main filter, causing the turbo to fail. The vacuum pump may also suffer due to this type of pollution.

As the turbo rotates at 230,000 rpm, it will generally be the first part of the engine showing any signs of failure. This can happen from 45,000km onwards if the oil level is low, or when the oil changes are not made in the periods set or potentially when the oil recommended by the manufacturer is not used.

 Related page: Oil Contamination / Oil Starvation / Lack of Lubrication
5303-970-0248

This turbo commonly fails as a result of contaminated oil or restricted oil supply issues, causing wear to the internal components of the turbocharger.

Related page: Oil Contamination / Oil Starvation
5303-970-0189

The Audi A4 1.9TDi and Audi 2.0TDi, are both Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) models and commonly suffer problems with the turbocharger unit failing.

Related page: Oil Contamination / Oil Starvation
5303-988-0205

On this variable nozzle turbocharger, carbon build up around the variable vanes assembly is a common mode of failure, restricting the movement of the actuator arm. The carbon build up around the variable vanes is commonly referred to as suffering with ‘sticky vanes’. This restriction can reduce boost pressure and can result in the vehicle being put into ‘limp home mode’ by the engine management system to try to prevent further damage to the vehicle. We are informed that drivers have experienced the ‘glow plug light’ coming on and/or intermittent power loss.

5438-988-0008

We have had reports that for this specific engine has an issue with the oil pump relating to this turbocharger.

5440-970-0021

On this variable nozzle turbocharger, carbon build up around the variable vanes assembly is a common mode of failure, restricting the movement of the actuator arm. The carbon build up around the variable vanes is commonly referred to as suffering with ‘sticky vanes’. This restriction can reduce boost pressure and can result in the vehicle being put into ‘limp home mode’ by the engine management system to try to prevent further damage to the vehicle. We are informed that drivers have experienced the ‘glow plug light’ coming on and/or intermittent power loss.

700935-0003

The engine breather assembly found on top of the CAM cover can get clogged causing the engine to perform less efficiently. This congestion then causes increased crankcase pressure which creates an increased back pressure in the sump forcing the oil back up the oil return pipe to the turbo. Over a period of time this escaping oil can build up carbon around the variable vane assembly restricting their movement (i.e. sticky vanes). This restriction affects the operation of the electronic actuator generating the fault codes picked up on the diagnostic test mentioned above.

The result can be a destroyed turbo or in other cases the driver may have experienced issues with the vehicle such as a lack of power and/or smoking from the exhaust leading up to the failure.

Related page: Oil Leaks

708639-0010

In most reported cases, the turbos mounted on the 1.9 dCi Renault engine fail due to the ingestion of a foreign object into either the compressor end or turbine end. Reports from our customers suggest the oil filter can become restricted causing lack of lubrication and subsequent turbocharger damage.

Related page: Lack of Lubrication
717858-0009

On this variable nozzle turbocharger, carbon build up around the variable vanes assembly is a common mode of failure, restricting the movement of the actuator arm. The carbon build up around the variable vanes is commonly referred to as suffering with ‘sticky vanes’. This restriction can reduce boost pressure and can result in the vehicle being put into ‘limp home mode’ by the engine management system to try to prevent further damage to the vehicle. We are informed that drivers have experienced the ‘glow plug light’ coming on and/or intermittent power loss.

720168-0011

The oil drain pipe has a tendency to clog over time causing increased oil pressure within the turbo. This increased pressure causes the oil to pass into the exhaust system and air intake of the engine, causing blue smoke from the exhaust. This problem can happen even during the process of fitting a new turbo, even when it has previously not happened. The oil drain pipe must be replaced on changing the turbo.

Related page: Oil Leaks
724930-0010

On this variable nozzle turbocharger, carbon build up around the variable vanes assembly is a common mode of failure, restricting the movement of the actuator arm. The carbon build up around the variable vanes is commonly referred to as suffering with ‘sticky vanes’. This restriction can reduce boost pressure and can result in the vehicle being put into ‘limp home mode’ by the engine management system to try to prevent further damage to the vehicle. We are informed that drivers have experienced the ‘glow plug light’ coming on and/or intermittent power loss.

727477-000*

Nissan introduced a software update on the Primera, Almera, Almera Tino and X-Trail models as the turbos were subject to significant boost in a small space of time causing overspeeding and other issues.

Related page: Overspeeding
728680-0007 / 0009 / 0010 / 0012 / 0013 / 0015

The common reason for failure is a carbon build up around the variable vanes assembly, which restricts the movement of the actuator arm and generates a fault code in the electronic actuator. This carbon build up around the variable vanes is commonly referred to as suffering with ‘sticky vanes’.

This restriction can cause the turbo to experience boost pressure issues and can result in the vehicle being put into ‘limp mode’ (limp home mode) by the engine management system to try to prevent further damage to the vehicle. Sometimes the first thing the driver can experience is the ‘glow plug light’ coming on and intermittent power loss.

What we hear in the market is that engines produce the fault code P132B. The fault code P132B relates to a REA fault (Rotary Electronic Actuator fault) and this is picked up when testing the Electronic Actuator for fault codes.

Click on the turbo number for Melett parts availability: 728680-0007 / 728680-0009 / 728680-0010 / 728680-0012 / 728680-0013 / 728680-0015
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728680-0015

On this variable nozzle turbocharger, carbon build up around the variable vanes assembly is a common mode of failure, restricting the movement of the actuator arm. The carbon build up around the variable vanes is commonly referred to as suffering with ‘sticky vanes’. This restriction can reduce boost pressure and can result in the vehicle being put into ‘limp home mode’ by the engine management system to try to prevent further damage to the vehicle. We are informed that drivers have experienced the ‘glow plug light’ coming on and/or intermittent power loss.

731877-0010

We have had reports that faulty electronic actuator boxes are common on these turbochargers. Fault codes are normally identified when a diagnostic test is performed on the vehicle and this type of failure is often a result of a blocked engine breather assembly.

The engine breather assembly found on top of the CAM cover can get clogged causing the engine to perform less efficiently. This congestion then causes increased crankcase pressure which creates an increased back pressure in the sump forcing the oil back up the oil return pipe to the turbo. Over a period of time this escaping oil can build up carbon around the variable vane assembly restricting their movement (i.e. sticky vanes). This restriction affects the operation of the electronic actuator generating the fault codes picked up on the diagnostic test mentioned above.

The result can be a destroyed turbo or in other cases the driver may have experienced issues with the vehicle such as a lack of power and/or smoking from the exhaust leading up to the failure.

Related page:Oil Leaks

742693-0003

On this variable nozzle turbocharger, carbon build up around the variable vanes assembly is a common mode of failure, restricting the movement of the actuator arm. The carbon build up around the variable vanes is commonly referred to as suffering with ‘sticky vanes’. This restriction can reduce boost pressure and can result in the vehicle being put into ‘limp home mode’ by the engine management system to try to prevent further damage to the vehicle. We are informed that drivers have experienced the ‘glow plug light’ coming on and/or intermittent power loss.

742730-0018

We have had reports that faulty electronic actuator boxes are common on these turbochargers. Fault codes are normally identified when a diagnostic test is performed on the vehicle and this type of failure is often a result of a blocked engine breather assembly.

The engine breather assembly found on top of the CAM cover can get clogged causing the engine to perform less efficiently. This congestion then causes increased crankcase pressure which creates an increased back pressure in the sump forcing the oil back up the oil return pipe to the turbo. Over a period of time this escaping oil can build up carbon around the variable vane assembly restricting their movement (i.e. sticky vanes). This restriction affects the operation of the electronic actuator generating the fault codes picked up on the diagnostic test mentioned above.

The result can be a destroyed turbo or in other cases the driver may have experienced issues with the vehicle such as a lack of power and/or smoking from the exhaust leading up to the failure.

Related page: Oil Leaks
750080-0018

We have had reports that faulty electronic actuator boxes are common on these turbochargers. Fault codes are normally identified when a diagnostic test is performed on the vehicle and this type of failure is often a result of a blocked engine breather assembly.

The engine breather assembly found on top of the CAM cover can get clogged causing the engine to perform less efficiently. This congestion then causes increased crankcasepressure which creates an increased back pressure in the sump forcing the oil back up the oil return pipe to the turbo. Over a period of time this escaping oil can build up carbon around the variable vane assembly restricting their movement (i.e. sticky vanes). This restriction affects the operation of the electronic actuator generating the fault codes picked up on the diagnostic test mentioned above.

The result can be a destroyed turbo or in other cases the driver may have experienced issues with the vehicle such as a lack of power and/or smoking from the exhaust leading up to the failure.

Related page: Oil Leaks
751768-0004

On this variable nozzle turbocharger, carbon build up around the variable vanes assembly is a common mode of failure, restricting the movement of the actuator arm. The carbon build up around the variable vanes is commonly referred to as suffering with ‘sticky vanes’. This restriction can reduce boost pressure and can result in the vehicle being put into ‘limp home mode’ by the engine management system to try to prevent further damage to the vehicle. We are informed that drivers have experienced the ‘glow plug light’ coming on and/or intermittent power loss.

In addition

Foreign object damage to the air intake side of the turbo (compressor side) is reported as common mode of turbocharger failure. Signs of a problem include loud noises such as whistling, or loss of performance.

In the case of foreign object damage to the compressor wheel blades, it is advisable to check the air filter element as well as the air filter housing, plus the intake hoses for dirt and damage.

Related page: Foreign Object Damage
751851-0004

A lot of the VW/Audi engines suffer from a carbon build up around the variable vanes assembly restricting the movement of the actuator arm. The carbon build up around the variable vanes is commonly referred to as suffering with ‘sticky vanes’. This restriction can reduce boost pressure and can result in the vehicle being put into ‘limp home mode’ by the engine management system to try to prevent further damage to the vehicle. We are informed that drivers have experienced the ‘glow plug light’ coming on and/or intermittent power loss.

In addition, if the lack of power is combined with loud noises, such as whistling, then there could be a strong chance that the turbo has suffered from foreign object damage to the compressor side the turbo.

Related page: Foreign Object Damage
752610-0032

On this variable nozzle turbocharger, carbon build up around the variable vanes assembly is a common mode of failure, restricting the movement of the actuator arm. The carbon build up around the variable vanes is commonly referred to as suffering with ‘sticky vanes’. This restriction can reduce boost pressure and can result in the vehicle being put into ‘limp home mode’ by the engine management system to try to prevent further damage to the vehicle. We are informed that drivers have experienced the ‘glow plug light’ coming on and/or intermittent power loss.

753392-*

On this variable nozzle turbocharger, carbon build up around the variable vanes assembly is a common mode of failure, restricting the movement of the actuator arm. The carbon build up around the variable vanes is commonly referred to as suffering with ‘sticky vanes’. This restriction can reduce boost pressure and can result in the vehicle being put into ‘limp home mode’ by the engine management system to try to prevent further damage to the vehicle. We are informed that drivers have experienced the ‘glow plug light’ coming on and/or intermittent power loss.

753420-0005

The PSA 1.6HDi engine is designed to work at high temperatures and using good quality oil is essential. PSA has installed a filter on the oil feed pipe to the turbo and an integral filter/oil cooler to ensure that it performs efficiently. If a lower grade oil is used, reports indicate that if the engine runs on oil levels below normal, this can potentially cause a high concentration of soot in the oil. This soot can block the filter installed in the turbo supply pipe, the oil cooler and main filter, causing the turbo to fail. The vacuum pump may also suffer due to this type of pollution.

As the turbo rotates at 230,000 rpm, it will generally be the first part of the engine showing any signs of failure. This can happen from 45,000km onwards if the oil level is low, or when the oil changes are not made in the periods set or potentially when the oil recommended by the manufacturer is not used.

 Related page: Oil Contamination / Oil Starvation / Lack of Lubrication
758219-0004

On this variable nozzle turbocharger, carbon build up around the variable vanes assembly is a common mode of failure, restricting the movement of the actuator arm. The carbon build up around the variable vanes is commonly referred to as suffering with ‘sticky vanes’. This restriction can reduce boost pressure and can result in the vehicle being put into ‘limp home mode’ by the engine management system to try to prevent further damage to the vehicle. We are informed that drivers have experienced the ‘glow plug light’ coming on and/or intermittent power loss.

Click on the turbo number for Melett parts availability: 758219-0004

758226-0004/8/10

We have had reports that faulty electronic actuator boxes are common on these turbochargers. Common problems include a faulty electronic box caused by bonding wire issues between  the cap and board or the result of a blocked engine breather assembly.

The engine breather assembly found on top of the CAM cover can get clogged causing the engine to perform less efficiently. This congestion then causes increased crankcasepressure which creates an increased back pressure in the sump forcing the oil back up the oil return pipe to the turbo. Over a period of time this escaping oil can build up carbon around the variable vane assembly restricting their movement (i.e. sticky vanes). This restriction affects the operation of the electronic actuator generating the fault codes picked up on the diagnostic test mentioned above.

The result can be a destroyed turbo or in other cases the driver may have experienced issues with the vehicle such as a lack of power and/or smoking from the exhaust leading up to the failure.

Click on the turbo number for Melett parts availability: 758226-0004/ 758226-0008/758226-0010

758351-0024

We have had reports that faulty electronic actuator boxes are common on these turbochargers. Fault codes are normally identified when a diagnostic test is performed on the vehicle and this type of failure is often a result of a blocked engine breather assembly.

The engine breather assembly found on top of the CAM cover can get clogged causing the engine to perform less efficiently. This congestion then causes increased crankcasepressure which creates an increased back pressure in the sump forcing the oil back up the oil return pipe to the turbo. Over a period of time this escaping oil can build up carbon around the variable vane assembly restricting their movement (i.e. sticky vanes). This restriction affects the operation of the electronic actuator generating the fault codes picked up on the diagnostic test mentioned above.

The result can be a destroyed turbo or in other cases the driver may have experienced issues with the vehicle such as a lack of power and/or smoking from the exhaust leading up to the failure.

Related page: Oil Leaks

760774-0005

On this variable nozzle turbocharger, carbon build up around the variable vanes assembly is a common mode of failure, restricting the movement of the actuator arm. The carbon build up around the variable vanes is commonly referred to as suffering with ‘sticky vanes’. This restriction can reduce boost pressure and can result in the vehicle being put into ‘limp home mode’ by the engine management system to try to prevent further damage to the vehicle. We are informed that drivers have experienced the ‘glow plug light’ coming on and/or intermittent power loss.

762965-*

A common failure is lack of lubrication due to restrictions to the oil feed pipe.

Related page: Lack of Lubrication
762965-0001 / 0002 / 0003 / 0007 / 0008 / 0020

We have received reports that faulty electronic actuator boxes are common on these turbochargers. Fault codes are normally identified when a diagnostic test is performed on the vehicle and this type of failure is often a result of a blocked engine breather assembly.

The engine breather assembly found on top of the CAM cover can get clogged causing the engine to perform less efficiently. This congestion then causes increased crankcase pressure, which creates an increased back pressure in the sump forcing the oil back up the oil return pipe to the turbo. Over a period of time this escaping oil can cause a carbon build up around the variable vane assembly restricting their movement (i.e. sticky vanes). This restriction affects the operation of the electronic actuator generating the fault codes picked up on the diagnostic test mentioned above.

The result can be a destroyed turbo or in other cases the driver may have experienced issues with the vehicle, such as a lack of power and/or smoking from the exhaust leading up to the failure.

Click on the turbo number for Melett parts availability: 762965-0001 / 762965-0002 / 762965-0003 / 762965-0007 / 762965-0008 / 762965-0020

Related page: Oil Leaks
763091-0004

We have received reports that faulty electronic actuator boxes are common on these turbochargers. Fault codes are normally identified when a diagnostic test is performed on the vehicle and this type of failure is often a result of a blocked engine breather assembly.

The engine breather assembly found on top of the CAM cover can get clogged causing the engine to perform less efficiently. This congestion then causes increased crankcase pressure, which creates an increased back pressure in the sump forcing the oil back up the oil return pipe to the turbo. Over a period of time this escaping oil can cause a carbon build up around the variable vane assembly restricting their movement (i.e. sticky vanes). This restriction affects the operation of the electronic actuator generating the fault codes picked up on the diagnostic test mentioned above.

The result can be a destroyed turbo or in other cases the driver may have experienced issues with the vehicle, such as a lack of power and/or smoking from the exhaust leading up to the failure.

Related page: Oil Leaks
763647-0021

We have had reports that faulty electronic actuator boxes are common on these turbochargers. Fault codes are normally identified when a diagnostic test is performed on the vehicle and this type of failure nearly always associated with issues inside the exhaust side of the turbocharger.

On this variable nozzle turbocharger, carbon build up around the variable vanes assembly is a common mode of failure, restricting the movement of the actuator arm. The carbon build up around the variable vanes is commonly referred to as suffering with ‘sticky vanes’. This restriction can reduce boost pressure and can result in the vehicle being put into ‘limp home mode’ by the engine management system to try to prevent further damage to the vehicle. We are informed that drivers have experienced the ‘glow plug light’ coming on and/or intermittent power loss.

765155-0007

On this variable nozzle turbocharger, carbon build up around the variable vanes assembly is a common mode of failure, restricting the movement of the actuator arm. The carbon build up around the variable vanes is commonly referred to as suffering with ‘sticky vanes’. This restriction can reduce boost pressure and can result in the vehicle being put into ‘limp home mode’ by the engine management system to try to prevent further damage to the vehicle. We are informed that drivers have experienced the ‘glow plug light’ coming on and/or intermittent power loss.

767378-0010/ 767378-0014

We have had reports that faulty electronic actuator boxes are common on these BMW turbochargers. Fault codes are normally identified when a diagnostic test is performed on the vehicle and this type of failure is often a result of a blocked engine breather assembly.

The engine (N47) has an integrated breather assembly found in the cam cover and can commonly get clogged causing the engine to perform less efficiently. In addition, it is also recommended that a ‘Regeneration’ of the Diesel Particle Filter (DPF) is completed as the DPF can become clogged due to the breather assembly problems. If the exhaust backpressure continues to rise and is not resolved this will in turn cause the exhaust gases to force the turbos shaft assembly back damaging the thrust bearing in the turbo, which usually results in the turbo destroying itself. These issues then affect the operation of the electronic actuator generating the fault codes picked up on the diagnostic tests mentioned above.

In some cases the outcome is a destroyed turbo and generally the driver has been experiencing issues such as a lack of power with the vehicle and the vehicle smoking from the exhaust leading up to the failure.

Related pages: Oil Contamination / Oil Starvation 

Click on the turbo number for Melett parts availability: 767378-0010/ 767378-0014

767835-0003

Foreign object damage to the air intake side of the turbo (compressor side) is reported as common mode of turbocharger failure. Signs of a problem include loud noises such as whistling, or loss of performance.

In the case of foreign object damage to the compressor wheel blades, it is advisable to check the air filter element as well as the air filter housing, plus the intake hoses for dirt and damage.

 Related page: Foreign Object Damage
778401-*

We have received reports that oil leaks are one of the main reasons the turbocharger fails.
Vehicles from 2013 onwards have an upgraded oil feed pipe, we recommend the latest oil feed pipe is used on all repairs to avoid oil.

Related page:Oil Leaks
781504-0004

The oil inlet hose has a tendency to clog over time, due to its proximity to the exhaust manifold. This  dramatically reduces the oil flow reaching the turbo and results in a lack of lubrication.  It is imperative to replace the oil inlet hose when the turbocharger is replaced / remanufactured.

Related page: Oil Starvation / Lack of Lubrication
VF40

This turbocharger has a microfilter fitted in the oil feed, which becomes blocked over time and restricts the oil supply to the core assembly, resulting in failure. Some of our customers remove this microfilter altogether to prevent the same failure reoccurring. The turbine housings can also become badly damaged as a consequence of the initial failure.

Related page: Oil Starvation / Lack of Lubrication
VICF

Due to the hardening of a flexible gasket between the oil suction pipe and the strainer in the sump, the oil pump draws a mixture of air and oil causing a reduction in oil pressure. This can cause an oil leak and result in turbo failure.

Related page:Oil Leaks
VJ32

Vehicles with this turbo have experienced serious Diesel Particle Filter (DPF) issues and if not quickly resolved, it can lead to other problems such as:

• Blockage of the DPF – resulting in warning Lights On Dash, loss of power & limp home mode

• Unable to stop ‘Regeneration Mode’ – resulting in Diesel leaking into the oil and lack of lubication

• Carbon deposits clogg the EGR valve

• Backpressure caused by carbon deposits which can lead to total turbo failure

• Damage to Injectors caused by carbon back up

• Damage to the engine seals which can cause over pressurising

Customers have advised, it is best to just get the DPF system completely removed by a specialist company.

Related page: Oil Leaks / Lack of Lubrication
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