OEM v Aftermarket components

Within the automotive parts industry there are two main types of component producers; OEM and Aftermarket manufacturers. Here we highlight the main differences of OEM v Aftermarket components.

Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM)

The OEM is the original producer of a vehicle’s components, so OEM car parts are identical to the parts originally used in producing a vehicle. As the original suppliers of a vehicle’s components, OEMs often have their products sold by branded car dealerships and are available to order through the automaker directly. OEM products are endorsed by the automaker and are often significantly more expensive than aftermarket parts.

The automaker usually guarantees OEM parts to be compatible with the vehicle; installation of the parts may also be guaranteed in some cases. OEM products are usually only available for purchase directly through dealerships while aftermarket parts may be purchased online from a variety of vendors.

 

Aftermarket Manufacturers

Aftermarket parts are produced by other manufacturers. Many aftermarket components such as Melett turbochargers and turbo parts are high-quality products, often available at a lower price than OEM parts. Some, however can be of varying levels of quality or compatibility with the vehicle.

Fierce competition in the automotive parts industry creates a strong need for OEM and aftermarket manufacturers to distinguish themselves in the parts market. Among aftermarket manufacturers, this competition results in a wide range of prices and unique features of parts. The quality of some aftermarket parts equals or exceeds OEM products, while other parts companies compete by offering lower-priced products of inferior quality.